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That time of year again!
Meagan is our duty vet this weekend
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6 days ago

GVG Brooks Equine Veterinary Practice

🚨🍂 ATYPICAL MYOPATHY 🍂🚨

A warning about the awful disease, as we're in autumn we are in the peak season for highest numbers of horse affected.

Atypical Myopathy is a disease affecting horses grazing pasture containing or surrounded by sycamore trees, with spikes in the number of cases seen in autumn and spring. The seeds and saplings contain Hyperglycin A, a toxin which results in severe systemic disease.

The toxin is present at varying levels between seeds and trees, making it extremely difficult to predict if a horse will become sick following exposure. Toxin testing for tree samples is available from the RVC, to determine level of toxin and associated risk.

Early signs of the disease include lethargy, quieter demeanour, mild stiffness and muscle weakness. These can rapidly deteriorate to severe muscle stiffness, weakness, muscle tremors, reluctance to move and increased periods laying down. Severe cases may be found lying down, unable to stand. These horses are often extremely painful and will look colicky.

Diagnosis is by blood sampling – raised muscle enzymes may be indicative, but confirmation is based on confirmation of the toxin in the blood.

Prevention is vital in this life-threatening disease – as autumn approaches it is important you fence off areas of pasture potentially contaminated by sycamore, and regularly check paddocks that could be contaminated, removing seeds (seeds can travel a kilometre in high winds) and provide supplementary forage in the autumn months.

If you have any concerns about prevention please don't hesitate to get in touch with our team.

If you think your horse could be suffering with Atypical Myopathy contact us immediately, the disease is a medical emergency. We are available 24/7 on 01737 246109.
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BE BRIGHT, BE SEEN

Wearing Hi-Viz can give vehicle drivers a VALUBLE THREE SECONDS of EXTRA REACTION time that could save the life of yourself or your horse. To put this into context those three seconds are equivalent to a car travelling 30mph, travelling the length of a standard dressage arena.
Research also shows helicopters can see rider Hi-Viz up to half a mile sooner than those with out, which saves time searching for those unfortunate enough to have had an accident in open countryside.

With days being shorter and weather gloomier, it is important to be safe and visible. To help with visibility in traffic and bad weather Hi-Viz is essential. Ideally however it should be worn regardless of the time day, season or weather conditions.

Some insurance companies will offer better premiums or benefits to rider if wearing Hi-Viz clothing when out, especially if involved in an accident

Huge amounts of Hi-Viz are available for example in the form of jackets, tabards, chaps, reflective jods, and hat bands for the rider. Quarter sheets, leg bands and bridle attachments for the horse.

Florescent pink, yellow, orange, green, orange/red are all available but when choosing what colour, think about the background you will be riding against as you could blend in. For example if you ride near fields of rape in bloom, yellow may not be the best choice, orange if in highly wooded areas may not be ideal in autumn.

Also keep your Hi-Viz regularly washed as dirty Hi-Viz is not as bright/reflective as clean!
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October is our Veteran Horse month so keep an eye out for our blogs, first of which was published yesterday for tips and advice on all sort of topics to help owners.
Have a great weekend, Sally is our duty vet.
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🐴👴🏼👵🏼 FEEDING ADVICE FOR OLDER HORSES 👵🏼👴🏼🐴

October is our veteran horse health month. With the nights drawing in closer, owners of older horses are thinking about how they’re going to keep their horses an appropriate weight over the colder months.

Read our latest blog to see some handy hints and tips on keeping your older horse in top condition over the colder months:
www.gvgbrooksequine.co.uk/feeding-the-older-horse/

Key Points:
• Feed according to the individual – if they’ve been a good doer all their life just because they’re getting on a bit doesn’t mean they need more calories! Light Veteran feeds may be more appropriate for these horses
• Bulk of diet should be fibre – fibre will promote gut health and provide fuel for the horse’s internal combustion engine (the caecum), keeping them warm in colder months
• Veteran feeds are better than standard mixes or cubes, they provide a step-up in calories and fibre and provide additional vitamins and minerals, but without lots of cereal ingredients which are more difficult to digest and can increase risk of colic and laminitis
• Veteran feeds which are soaked are great, especially in winter months to ensure sufficient fluid intake, horses drink less when its cold
• Feed according to disease status – if the horse has PPID (Cushings) / EMS aim for lower sugar and starch feeds to reduce risk of laminitis (no higher than 10% total starch and sugar level)
• Adding oil is a great way to get in more calories without making them fizzy
• If there are concerns with teeth, hay replacers may be necessary (fed alongside hard feed) – Sugar Beet products are only suitable as partial forage replacers. High fibre cubes and nuts soaked work well as forage replacers. If you need specific advice get in touch.
• Dental checks are vital in older horses, aim to have your horse’s mouth checked every 6 months by a vet or qualified equine dental technician. Why not have us have a look when we’re next at your yard?

If you’re struggling to get weight on an older horse or unsure how you’re going to cope once the colder months hit, get in touch with us now to have a chat with one of our vets.
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1 week ago

GVG Brooks Equine Veterinary Practice

Some great pictures from Equine Dentistry Referrals here, showing the damage caused on the inside of the horse’s cheeks as a result of sharp edges.

We all know how painful mouth ulcers can be, we never cease to be amazed at how much horses put up with! If you imagine these causing oral pain when eating, and then consider the increase in pain when a tight noseband is worn, forcing the cheeks to lay next to the teeth.

These are completely avoidable with regular oral examination by a vet or qualified equine dental technician. We recommend horses mouths are examined every 6-12 months.

Next time you book your horse in for a vaccination, have us perform an oral examination too. Why not take advantage of our zone visits to benefit from a reduced visit fee?Another day, and sadly more horses with buccal ulceration as a result of avoidable sharp edges......
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2 weeks ago

GVG Brooks Equine Veterinary Practice

End of season round up from supported rider Team Poco Loco SJ, with some lovely photos 🙂Quick update: Summer season is officially over☹️ But what a season it’s been! More wins, placing and prize money this season than we have ever had in a year so really proud of that! Lots of achievements this year including qualifying for the Bronze league Semi final by finishing in the top 15 of the South East league, 4th in our National Final, coming home with a 2nd too! Also winning the south east ROR league! He’s had a quiet few months and is now getting ready for a few winter qualifiers😊

Blaze is now on full loan to one of our lovely liveries and Jess is still loving life with her sharers!💕

A massive thank you to all my wonderful supporters and sponsors throughout the year, always feel so proud to be associated with such fab companies!

Coltsfoot Equestrian
GVG Brooks Equine Veterinary Practice
Horley Carpets and Flooring
#McCubbineFarming
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2 weeks ago

GVG Brooks Equine Veterinary Practice

🚨🍂 ATYPICAL MYOPATHY 🍂🚨

A warning about the awful disease, as we're in autumn we are in the peak season for highest numbers of horse affected.

Atypical Myopathy is a disease affecting horses grazing pasture containing or surrounded by sycamore trees, with spikes in the number of cases seen in autumn and spring. The seeds and saplings contain Hyperglycin A, a toxin which results in severe systemic disease.

The toxin is present at varying levels between seeds and trees, making it extremely difficult to predict if a horse will become sick following exposure.

Toxin testing for tree samples is available from the RVC, to determine level of toxin and associated risk.

Early signs of the disease include lethargy, quieter demeanour, mild stiffness and muscle weakness. These can rapidly deteriorate to severe muscle stiffness, weakness, muscle tremors, reluctance to move and increased periods laying down. Severe cases may be found lying down, unable to stand. These horses are often extremely painful and will look colicky.

Diagnosis is by blood sampling – raised muscle enzymes may be indicative, but confirmation is based on confirmation of the toxin in the blood.

Prevention is vital in this life-threatening disease – as autumn approaches it is important you fence off areas of pasture potentially contaminated by sycamore, and regularly check paddocks that could be contaminated, removing seeds (seeds can travel a kilometre in high winds) and provide supplementary forage in the autumn months.

If you have any concerns about prevention please don't hesitate to get in touch with our team.

If you think your horse could be suffering with Atypical Myopathy contact us immediately, the disease is a medical emergency. We are available 24/7 on 01737 246109.
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Good luck to those competing at HOYS over the weekend!
Steve is our duty vet on this weekend.
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🎓🎓 QUESTION TIME - ANSWER 🎓🎓

What is shown in the photo?
It is indeed a sarcoid, a nodular type. Its a reasonably big lesion, overlying the gastrocnemius tendon above the hock.

How can we treat it?
This is a potentially challenging area to treat due to the proximity to the tendon. Options for treatment include topical chemotherapy agents (such as AW4-LUDES (Liverpool Cream)), laser surgery or banding using elastrators (as used for castrating lambs).

If your horse has a suspicious sarcoid-like lump we urge you to act sooner rather than later. Treatment is far simpler and often more effective when performed when the lesions are smaller, and before they have had the opportunity to spread. Its a good time of year to consider treatment as the flies are backing off.

Get in touch if you'd like to discuss treatment options for your horse.
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